Desiderata 13

Desiderata 13

Desiderata is a poem loved by many for its wisdom and quiet optimism. This is the 13th blog in a series on the poem, as we mine its riches line by line.

“Beyond a wholesome discipline, be gentle with yourself.”

Desiderata is full of wisdom, but it holds some nuggets that are bigger and even more important than others. “Be yourself”, earlier in the poem, was one. This is another.

I know why the author speaks of wholesome discipline. Because, too often, the discipline we place ourselves under is anything but. He also exhorts us to be gentle with ourselves. Why? Because, invariably, we are not.

Like most of us, I have tried to improve in areas important to me over the years, and have given myself a hard time when I’ve fallen short. After all, there’s a lot riding on it, or so we think. We want to be successful in life, and can get discouraged when stubborn habits or weaknesses remain in spite of our best efforts. So we double down on them, and try even harder. Some of us just give up, but even then our inner critic doesn’t.

We’ve all have been told, by self image experts, to love ourselves, because we all too easily hate ourselves. That’s a tricky thing to pull off, and by the way, I don’t think they’ve got it quite right. Let me attempt to bring some clarification before we move forward.

I believe we already care deeply about ourselves – without exception. We care deeply enough to hate the things about us that stop us from living fulfilled lives. Subtle difference but I believe it’s important. We hate the things about ourselves that get in the way of happiness, and so we work on those things in an effort to fix them and then to be happy. The fact that some people punish themselves is a reflection that they believe punishment will do them good, that it will motivate them to change and be better people. It doesn’t.

That’s why any self-discipline must be wholesome. I want to change, but beating myself about the head and demeaning myself with my self-talk (“you idiot”, “how could you be so stupid”) doesn’t get me anywhere. Does it get you anywhere?

So why do we do it if it’s so unhelpful? I’m tempted at this point to pull up a psychiatrist’s couch and talk to you about your role models (believe it or not, your parents for the most part). But I’ll resist, and say for now that somewhere along the way you learnt that negative language is part of the way to fix things. Your thinking might go along these lines – “If I’m soft on myself, I’ll never change. Got to be tough, got to face up to it, grit my teeth, take my medicine. Saying “there, there, you poor thing” isn’t going to help me change”.

And you know, you’re right. We do have to be tough on ourselves. And self-pity isn’t really isn’t going to help. But sooner or later we have to replace the punitive self-language (and punitive behaviours) with a discipline that helps, not hinders.

And that’s a can of worms in itself. As I’ve said a number of times, this is no self help blog, it’s a sharing blog. I’m not going to state the “5 top things you need to do to overcome your negative self image”.

But I will point you in a general direction. Ask yourself the question “Are my internal attempts at discipline wholesome?”. Definition – “Wholesome – conducive to or suggestive of good health and physical well being” (from Google search). “Wholesome – promoting health or well being of mind or spirit” (Merrimack Webster dictionary).  “Wholesome – conducive to moral or general well being; salutary; beneficial”. (Dictionary.com).

You might say your goal is to be wholesome. Desiderata suggests that your efforts to get there need to be wholesome too. Can you say that your attempts to improve are wholesome, or do they put you on a knife edge of achievement or failure? Not just the result, but the process. If you find yourself wrung out, angry at yourself, or even disgusted in your attempts to improve – it’s not wholesome. 

Something needs to change. Desiderata tells us to be gentle with ourselves. I can imagine many people muttering to themselves “That will never work”. The stakes are too high – failure hurts too much. Being soft isn’t going to cut it.

I think the only way we can swallow this is to recognise that being hard on ourselves hasn’t worked – and it never will. Or if it has “worked” then we continue to live with an inner monster waiting to pounce on us the moment we fail. No, we have to realise it doesn’t work, and only then will we consider other options.

Have high expectations, yes. Gird yourself for action –  yes. But what if it takes a longer time to change than you would like? What if in fact we never do change to the degree we want? We have to get the point of “So be it”. Never give up (and I mean that) but recognise that a longer or slower process may be, and often is, necessary. Patience with ourselves tends to take the edge off that inner critic. Try it.

Let me finish with a light hearted story about myself. I love desserts – have a real sweet tooth. Now that the kids have grown up, Linda doesn’t make dessert so often. That’s okay – I’ve stepped up to the plate instead. I’ve never really cooked much, but about a year ago I started making my favourite desserts. And to my delight, they turned out pretty nicely, so I have continued.

But I’m fussy – I want to make a great dessert. So when I eat my desserts, I talk like a food critic –“hmmmm, pastry is a little dry, filling is yummy but needs a little more (whatever)….”. Linda likes my desserts too, and joins in a little with the food critic thing as well. I end up saying “Next time I’ll (add less flour, make more syrup…)” and Linda shakes her head. She says “It’s a good dessert, why do you want to make it perfect?”.

I had to think about my answer for a while, and it wasn’t because I was being hard on myself. Not at all – I really did enjoy my successes, and didn’t hate my mistakes. But I wanted to perfect each dessert because I wanted to enjoy the eating of it even more. I want to take a bite and be transported as much as possible to culinary heaven (did I say I love food?). The whole exercise isn’t filled with dread (I must make the perfect dessert or I’m worth nothing!) – it’s simply a desire to enjoy as much as possible what I create. And if I stuff up a dessert, I’m only mildly disappointed – I don’t take it to heart. There’s always next time.

Now, I know that making desserts is hardly live or die stuff. For many of us, particularly those in their aspirational years (teens to forties?) we desperately want to achieve happiness, whatever that looks like for us. But the principle is the same. Can you enjoy your successes? Learn and move on? Recognise that you’re doing your best and that’s what matters? Can you be gentle with yourself?

This is a longer blog than normal, and I feel I could say so much more, because learning a wholesome discipline is not easy, and I failed spectacularly as a younger man in this regard (still learning now, of course). I haven’t stopped in my desire to improve, and I don’t think I ever will. But I am more patient, I enjoy the fruits of my labour more for what they are than for how others will perceive me, and I think that helps my self-discipline to be more wholesome as well.

Maybe for you, my illustrations don’t really help. Maybe patience, for example, isn’t enough, or it’s beyond your reach right now. But whatever it takes, find a way to make your self discipline less accusing, less judgemental. Beyond a wholesome discipline, be gentle with yourself.

Desiderata

Go placidly amid the noise and haste,
and remember what peace there may be in silence.
As far as possible without surrender
be on good terms with all persons.
Speak your truth quietly and clearly;
and listen to others,
even the dull and the ignorant;
they too have their story.

Avoid loud and aggressive persons,
they are vexations to the spirit.
If you compare yourself with others,
you may become vain and bitter;
for always there will be greater and lesser persons than yourself.
Enjoy your achievements as well as your plans.

Keep interested in your own career, however humble;
it is a real possession in the changing fortunes of time.
Exercise caution in your business affairs;
for the world is full of trickery.
But let this not blind you to what virtue there is;
many persons strive for high ideals;
and everywhere life is full of heroism.

Be yourself.
Especially, do not feign affection.
Neither be cynical about love;
for in the face of all aridity and disenchantment
it is as perennial as the grass.

Take kindly the counsel of the years,
gracefully surrendering the things of youth.
Nurture strength of spirit to shield you in sudden misfortune.
But do not distress yourself with dark imaginings.
Many fears are born of fatigue and loneliness.
Beyond a wholesome discipline,
be gentle with yourself.

You are a child of the universe,
no less than the trees and the stars;
you have a right to be here.
And whether or not it is clear to you,
no doubt the universe is unfolding as it should.

Therefore be at peace with God,
whatever you conceive Him to be,
and whatever your labors and aspirations,
in the noisy confusion of life keep peace with your soul.

With all its sham, drudgery, and broken dreams,
it is still a beautiful world.
Be cheerful.
Strive to be happy.

Max Ehrmann, Desiderata, Copyright 1952.

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Desiderata 8

Be yourself – it’s harder than you think

desiderata 8

Desiderata is a poem loved by many for its wisdom and quiet optimism. This is the 8th blog in a series on the poem, as we mine its riches line by line.

“Be yourself. Especially do not feign affection”.

Surely all of us would agree straight away with this part of the poem. What more needs to be said? We’ve all heard that we need to be ourselves. Let’s just heed the advice and move on.

Not so fast. We need to ask, “if this is so obvious, why is it in the poem at all?” It’s because it’s so easy to lose sight of, and harder than you think.

“Be yourself”. That motto has to be the cornerstone of most of the self help books and advice that is on tap these days. The reason it is so pervasive in modern self help is because it’s in such short supply. Being yourself is hard to define, and even harder to live out.

Who are you anyway? Sounds like one of the questions a counsellor would ask you as you lie on the couch (just kidding – most counsellors don’t have couches). Are you what you do? “I’m a painter/architect/stay at home mum/policeman/analyst/stock broker/carpenter…… “. No, that’s not the answer.

Is it your social standing, your position in relation to others? A woman/man, son/daughter, wife/husband/single person/widow/divorcee, rich person/poor person, boss/employee, lover/guardian. I doubt it.

One clever person came up with the idea “it’s who you are when no-one’s looking.” Sounds good to me, but chances are most of us are too confused to know who we are even when we’re alone. About the only difference is that we drop the pretense that we masquerade around others. Admittedly there are a few people who are supremely self confident and comfortable in their own skin – hence they probably have a good idea of who they are. If you are such a one feel free to skip this blog!

For the rest of us, it is a genuinely tough thing to know who you are, let alone let yourself be it. I remember a young man said to me once “I hate who I am, so how can I just be myself?” When he dropped his attempts to please others, he was left with someone he didn’t know and didn’t like.

I trust you’re getting the picture. This phrase “Be yourself” is the single most recurring theme of Desiderata. If you read back through the previous posts, you will see how often the author’s advice comes back to protecting who you are and not losing sight of it.

I’ve been around for a while, and I think I know a thing or two on the subject. I’m not the best role model for self acceptance, but I’m all I’ve got, so I’d like to explain a little of what I’ve learnt.

I’ve got my share of weaknesses and foibles. This is not a confessional and I don’t intend to go into detail here, but I dare say as you read my blogs you’ll get some idea of what I am talking about (because I do tell on myself every now and then). And I have worked hard to overcome things that I haven’t liked about myself – had some successes and some failures too. And I don’t intend to stop now. But one thing I have learned – I know my limitations and I won’t hate myself because of them.

What’s the point of hating myself? It won’t change me – it won’t change you. It will only get in the way. Now you’d think that just accepting your weaknesses would mean you’re on the road to overcoming them. Well maybe – but maybe not. Accepting your weakness means just that – it’s there and it’s unlikely to go away easily. There are some things I’m just not good at, and some of those things I really, really wish I was good at. But I’m not. And though I’m open to growing and improving, I have come to accept that some things are not likely to ever change.

That means when things go wrong in some areas, I don’t get upset. I don’t set myself up for failure by trying to do something that I know I can’t do. Now that sounds a bit defeatist, and I don’t want to encourage that kind of attitude, but all I can say is that when the time comes you’ll know the difference between ‘giving up’ and having the wisdom to know not to expect too much in a certain area.

I’m reminded of an episode from the British TV series “Doc Martin”. He’s an irritable, easily upset person with atrocious people skills who happens to be a brilliant doctor in a small town. Someone in the village actually falls in love with him, and he with her (genuinely), but she eventually finds him impossible to live with. Cut a very long story short, she ends up deciding to stay with him because she loves him and accepts his oddness. Doesn’t try to change him. Doesn’t set him up by expecting him to do things she knows he just can’t do. Accepts that he loves her, and she loves him, and if they’re an odd couple, so be it. (See episode 6 of Season 8 if you’re interested).

Being yourself is no easy feat. And regarding the young man I spoke of, I can so easily understand his frustration. How hard is it for a young person, who so wants his life to be successful, to accept some things about himself which will most likely inhibit at least some of his life goals, but find peace in the rest and just get on with it?

I should say that just as I have accepted my flaws, I have also accepted what I’m good at. I won’t brag about them, and certainly not here, but when the occasion arises I have no trouble saying I’m good at something. And for the most part (maybe not always) I do so without pride. I am who I am. I’m good at this – I’m not good at that.

I haven’t addressed the second part of the quote -“Especially don’t feign affection”. It intrigues me that the author has singled this out more than anything else, but I’ve run out of room with this blog, so we’ll stop here and pick it up next time.

Desiderata

Go placidly amid the noise and haste,
and remember what peace there may be in silence.
As far as possible without surrender
be on good terms with all persons.
Speak your truth quietly and clearly;
and listen to others,
even the dull and the ignorant;
they too have their story.

Avoid loud and aggressive persons,
they are vexations to the spirit.
If you compare yourself with others,
you may become vain and bitter;
for always there will be greater and lesser persons than yourself.
Enjoy your achievements as well as your plans.

Keep interested in your own career, however humble;
it is a real possession in the changing fortunes of time.
Exercise caution in your business affairs;
for the world is full of trickery.
But let this not blind you to what virtue there is;
many persons strive for high ideals;
and everywhere life is full of heroism.

Be yourself.
Especially, do not feign affection.
Neither be cynical about love;
for in the face of all aridity and disenchantment
it is as perennial as the grass.

Take kindly the counsel of the years,
gracefully surrendering the things of youth.
Nurture strength of spirit to shield you in sudden misfortune.
But do not distress yourself with dark imaginings.
Many fears are born of fatigue and loneliness.
Beyond a wholesome discipline,
be gentle with yourself.

You are a child of the universe,
no less than the trees and the stars;
you have a right to be here.
And whether or not it is clear to you,
no doubt the universe is unfolding as it should.

Therefore be at peace with God,
whatever you conceive Him to be,
and whatever your labors and aspirations,
in the noisy confusion of life keep peace with your soul.

With all its sham, drudgery, and broken dreams,
it is still a beautiful world.
Be cheerful.
Strive to be happy.

Max Ehrmann, Desiderata, Copyright 1952.

Desiderata 5

The vexed issue of comparing ourselves with others

desiderata

Desiderata is a poem loved by many for its wisdom and quiet optimism. This is the 5th blog in a series on the poem as we mine its riches line by line.

“If you compare yourself with others, you may become vain and bitter; for always there will be greater and lesser persons than yourself. Enjoy your achievements as well as your plans.”

But we do. We compare ourselves with others all the time. We can’t help it. And surely it has to be one of the worst things we can do.

Am I smarter? More good looking? Faster? Stronger? More compassionate? More friendly? A better listener? A better lover? A better cook/mechanic/scientist/manager/leader/teacher/nurse/doctor/driver…..?

It’s tiring just thinking about it.

The fact is that the world rewards talent. If we’re better at something than someone else, we’ll get the job or get the affirmation or get the relationship. So how can we not compare ourselves to others? There’s simply too much at stake.

Here’s the thing. There will always be greater and lesser persons than yourself. Always. Without fail. Even if you were proclaimed the greatest person in your field, there’s always the chance that someone, somewhere, unknown to your peers or just simply unknown by anyone, is better.

I’m a good bass guitarist. Some people have raved about my playing ability. But my skills pale in comparison to many prominent well known bassists, and their skills in turn pale in comparison to the great bass players of the world. So what should I do? Measure myself by those inferior to me? Measure myself to those better than me?

I need to ask myself “why do I play?” Because I love to. And that’s what I need to focus on. Anything else takes my attention away from why I do to what I do.

Now admittedly, I don’t do it for the money. I have a day job that takes care of my monetary needs, so any cash from gigs is nice, but not needed. On the other hand, if I was a professional player making my living from it, my skills compared to others becomes more important because more is at stake.

After all, the better players will get more gigs – or will they? I’ve discovered that personality is just as important as skill. People will hire you for who you are just as much as for what you can do. I mean, obviously, you have to have the chops – you have to be good at what you do. But if you and the other guy are both competent enough, being extra good is no guarantee you’ll get the job over him or her.

Constantly Desiderata comes back to who you are. Comparing yourself to others is a sign that you are not comfortable with yourself. Although we all do it, some of us do it more than others. And we know what it feels like when we don’t measure up. Conversely, being perceived as better than someone else is just as bad. We get proud, or vain, and most likely set ourselves up for a fall. We’re looking at the wrong things.

And I’m not just talking about skill. We can be proud of how many friends we have (I’ve met people like that). We can be proud of how caring we are, or how helpful we can be, or we can berate ourselves for not being as sensitive or as loving as someone else. It’s the same thing. How trapped we become – because our focus is on the wrong thing.

So what should our focus be on? Desiderata goes on to say “Enjoy your achievements as well as your plans”. Well that’s one answer. Enjoying your achievements is pretty self evident, even though lots of people don’t. They’re too busy thinking about the next thing they have to do. But to enjoy your plans? What’s that all about?

You’ve probably heard the saying “enjoy the journey and not just the destination”. I’m guessing it’s something along those lines. I remember a proverb that stated “A wise decision is still wise even if fortune makes it of no effect. A foolish decision is still foolish, even if the outcome against all odds happens to be good”. In other words, the process is actually more important than the outcome.

Think about that. If you are caught up only with the outcome, then your happiness depends on its success or failure.  But if you allow the process to be satisfying as well, your own happiness and sense of worth is not tied to the more precarious and less controllable result. You are not measuring yourself by the outcome, but by the journey.

Now of course, if your journey was foolish or ill prepared, that’s a lesson for another time. But if you’ve done your best, or close to it, then a good outcome (though clearly desirable!) is not necessary to your own sense of self. And therefore others’ success or failure isn’t a measure  of who you are either.

These words are so easy to type, and another thing entirely to do. But that’s wisdom for you – it’s not easy, its just right.

Desiderata

Go placidly amid the noise and haste,
and remember what peace there may be in silence.
As far as possible without surrender
be on good terms with all persons.
Speak your truth quietly and clearly;
and listen to others,
even the dull and the ignorant;
they too have their story.

Avoid loud and aggressive persons,
they are vexations to the spirit.
If you compare yourself with others,
you may become vain and bitter;
for always there will be greater and lesser persons than yourself.
Enjoy your achievements as well as your plans.

Keep interested in your own career, however humble;
it is a real possession in the changing fortunes of time.
Exercise caution in your business affairs;
for the world is full of trickery.
But let this not blind you to what virtue there is;
many persons strive for high ideals;
and everywhere life is full of heroism.

Be yourself.
Especially, do not feign affection.
Neither be cynical about love;
for in the face of all aridity and disenchantment
it is as perennial as the grass.

Take kindly the counsel of the years,
gracefully surrendering the things of youth.
Nurture strength of spirit to shield you in sudden misfortune.
But do not distress yourself with dark imaginings.
Many fears are born of fatigue and loneliness.
Beyond a wholesome discipline,
be gentle with yourself.

You are a child of the universe,
no less than the trees and the stars;
you have a right to be here.
And whether or not it is clear to you,
no doubt the universe is unfolding as it should.

Therefore be at peace with God,
whatever you conceive Him to be,
and whatever your labors and aspirations,
in the noisy confusion of life keep peace with your soul.

With all its sham, drudgery, and broken dreams,
it is still a beautiful world.
Be cheerful.
Strive to be happy.

Max Ehrmann, Desiderata, Copyright 1952.

 

 

Practice makes perfect – or does it?

An old adage is challenged

images4

“Practice makes perfect”. A phrase most of us have heard, and probably often over our lifetime. But I heard that slogan challenged recently.

My wife told me of an interview she had heard with a well respected actress, who made the comment “practice doesn’t make perfect. Practice makes experienced”.

When I heard that, I thought, what a great comment. You see, like many people, I am afflicted with a tendency towards perfectionism, a lofty goal that is in fact unattainable. I know that, and have worked towards gaining a balanced perspective all my life. But still that tendency persists.

Perfectionism is a waste of time – literally. If you want to do something well, you might spend, let’s say, 1 hour on the task. If you want to do it extremely well, you might find you spend 2 hours or more on that same task. Now, aim for perfect – and you run out of time. Hours later, you settle for something less than perfect but close enough to be able to tick the box and move on (if you can).

And here’s the thing – when people aim for perfection, they start to see problems where there are none. Painters start to see errors in their painting and go over and over parts they are not happy with (and risk making it worse in the end). Katherine Hepburn, a renowned actress, used to hate watching herself on the silver screen, because she felt she could have done so much better. Housewives who strive for a spotless house can find themselves cleaning and recleaning sections that are already spotless.

You can see how perfectionism tends towards neurotic behaviour, and that’s because too much is riding on the outcome. If our work isn’t perfect, then just maybe we’re no good either. Even when a job is close to being well done, at best we feel a fleeting euphoria and at worst we just feel a sense of relief. I say fleeting because our next task has to prove all over again that we’re okay – and in fact it never will prove any such thing because we just don’t believe it anyway.

Now in a curious way society benefits from this relentless pursuit. We see breathtaking performances, amazing athletic feats, and breakthroughs in science from those who push closer and closer to finding elusive answers. Freud, interestingly enough, spoke of how many great things are achieved by people who are driven by neuroses. So too with perfectionism.

But do you really want to benefit mankind and live in abject misery, because nothing is ever good enough? If you’re like me, you’d rather get off the merry go round. Life is so much more enjoyable when you do.

Which brings me back to the phrase “Practice makes experienced”. It’s not as if this one phrase will revolutionise the world, but it is not only helpful, but really accurate too. We all want to do better – that’s a good thing. The more experienced we are in something the better we perform it, right? Usually anyway. That means there’s a much more attainable goal. Am I better at this thing than I was before? Yes? Then give myself a big pat on the back. Do I want to improve? Sure, let’s go for it.

What a relief it is to be able to think that way. Immediately the pressure if off. I can live with myself. I can be happy with where I am at, even though I want to get better.

In an ideal world this would create a restless contentment. I like that phrase – restless contentment. If we’re too content, life can become bland (though some of you might disagree with that). If we’re restless then we can never settle. To be in a state of restless contentment, we’re enjoying who we are, but looking forward to more.

I did say, in an ideal world. I still am routinely more restless than content, but I have learned to celebrate my successes, and I have learned to let go of the goal of perfection. Now all I want is “pretty damn good”!

Desiderata 2

More wisdom from Desiderata

 

desiderata1Following on from my post the other day, here is Desiderata, part 2. For those who haven’t read my previous post, Desiderata is a piece of prose full of wise sayings, which I would like to unpack and savour, a piece at a time. I intend to do this once every week or so until I either finish it or feel like I have nothing left to say on it.

Desiderata so far reads “Go placidly amidst the noise and the haste, and remember what peace there is in silence”. The next part which I will focus on today is “As far as possible, without surrender, be on good terms with all persons“.

I love that term “without surrender”. In order to please others we so often yield to their ideas or their will, in effect becoming a doormat or losing our own sense of self respect. And of course the opposite is also problematic – holding on to our views so strongly as to become pig headed and intolerant, and make enemies along the way.

Why is it important to be on good terms with all persons? Well, who needs enemies? Not only do we benefit from having people on our side (we all need help, and the best results often come from many minds), but we also don’t want to have people who are unnecessarily against us. You may be surprised how easily doors can close and how people we have made enemies of can make life difficult for us.

I’m a likeable enough kind of guy, but I do have a habit, from time to time, of inadvertently offending people in ways that I never intended. I’ll never forget when I was vying for a promotion in a company and was one of the top contenders. At a pub at the end of the day, when we were all having drinks, I went to leave and approached the boss to shake hands. Just before he put his hand out to shake mine, the person next to him put their hand out as well. I hate being in those positions! Anyway I made the mistake of shaking the other person’s hand first, leaving my boss with his hand out for a good 4-5 seconds (an eternity I expect). His face, which had been smiling, turned to stone.

I should point out I didn’t see this particular boss very often, so I had no way to ‘make it up to him’ or remove any negative vibes. He was not impressed, and I heard later that he had fiercely opposed my promotion whilst others had argued for me. No doubt he thought I had meant to slight him. I didn’t’ get the promotion (which turned out to be a good thing, but that’s another story).

I know you can read that and say that it might not have been the handshake (but if it wasn’t, at the very least it was the icing on the cake). The point is, though, that others have power. The fewer the potential enemies, the better off you are. Don’t fool yourself – don’t think you can make it all on your own.

But again, that wonderful phrase, “without surrender”. We should not at all costs try to please others. We must not sell our souls. There are some things that are just not worth giving up – our integrity. For example, there is nothing I could have done regarding my boss’s response (or rather, I wasn’t quick enough to know how to fix that faux pas at the time). Any efforts to try and befriend him were outside my skill set, and I would really have “surrendered myself” had I tried to “buddy” up to him.

Holding on to our integrity doesn’t mean we can’t be wise about how to handle people. In the gospels Jesus said “be as wise as serpents, and as innocent as doves”. A wise person will find a way, most of the time, to gain people’s friendship and influence choices, but retain their integrity in the process.

Being wise and innocent – a great juxtaposition of mindsets. The two aren’t mutually exclusive, but it is a tall order. A very tall order, and I would be surprised if there is anyone who can pull that off consistently. The temptation to give in to others or to selfishly manipulate must surely undo us all from time to time. But what a goal to aspire to. To me it comes back again and again to being secure within yourself. This is a recurring theme throughout Desiderata, and I expect I will refer to it often in the coming posts.

Such inner strength results in a person who recognises the value of others, and what we can achieve together, but not at the cost of their own peace.

I know myself pretty well – I give myself some credit and some criticism. In some things I am confident, but when it comes to being comfortable with who I am, that’s a work in progress, and always will be. To build your own sense of self, strong and secure, is a challenge, but one worth taking up.

So just those simple words “As far as possible without surrender, be at peace with all persons” set us a wonderful goal to lean towards, and a lifetime most likely in working it out.

Desiderata

“Go placidly amid the noise and haste, and remember what peace there may be in silence. 

As far as possible without surrender be on good terms with all persons.

Speak your truth quietly and clearly; and listen to others, 

even the dull and the ignorant; they too have their story.

 

Avoid loud and aggressive persons, they are vexations to the spirit.
If you compare yourself with others, you may become vain and bitter;
for always there will be greater and lesser persons than yourself.
Enjoy your achievements as well as your plans. 

Keep interested in your own career, however humble;
it is a real possession in the changing fortunes of time.
Exercise caution in your business affairs; for the world is full of trickery.
But let this not blind you to what virtue there is;
many persons strive for high ideals; and everywhere life is full of heroism. 

Be yourself.
Especially, do not feign affection. Neither be cynical about love;
for in the face of all aridity and disenchantment
it is as perennial as the grass. 

Take kindly the counsel of the years,
gracefully surrendering the things of youth.
Nurture strength of spirit to shield you in sudden misfortune.
But do not distress yourself with dark imaginings.
Many fears are born of fatigue and loneliness.
Beyond a wholesome discipline, be gentle with yourself. 

You are a child of the universe,
no less than the trees and the stars;
you have a right to be here.
And whether or not it is clear to you,
no doubt the universe is unfolding as it should. 

Therefore be at peace with God, whatever you conceive Him to be,
and whatever your labors and aspirations,
in the noisy confusion of life keep peace with your soul. 

With all its sham, drudgery, and broken dreams,
it is still a beautiful world.
Be cheerful. Strive to be happy.”

 

Max Ehrmann, Desiderata, Copyright 1952.

 

Oh Desiderata!

A timeless piece of writing that still speaks to today

I just reread the poem “Desiderata”, a widely known piece of prose and once used in a song (back in the 70’s?). Its pretty powerful. If you haven’t read it (or heard it), look it up.

I was always thought Desiderata was written by some monk from the 1600’s, it sounded so humble and profound. It is widely (and wrongly) held to be the case, but in fact it was written in 1927 by an American author, Max Ermann. The reason for the confusion surrounding its origins is because the poem was later included in a church book of devotional writings which included that particular church’s foundational date of 1692.

I remember it resonating with me back when I heard so long ago. It is a very peaceful and meaningful poem, though you may not agree with everything in it. I thought I might unpack a little of it today, and maybe unpack a little more from time to time going forward.

“Go placidly amid the noise and the haste, and remember what peace there may be in silence”.

Wow, if there ever was a noisy world, surely our Western society could be described that way. So much going on, so much instant access, so many opportunities….. It’s so easy to get churned up by the speed and clamour of things around us. Now I, for one, love excitement. I’m a bit of an adrenalin junkie, though less so now than when I was younger. I love it when things are happening, but I also find it hard to find peace.

I remember, many years ago, I was at a concert with a mosh pit out the front. By this time I was in my early 40’s, and the mosh pit was full of teenagers. I never had been in one before so I ventured forward, and found the whole experience absolutely electrifying, in a good way. I was buzzing for the next day or so! Sadly, I haven’t been in a position since then to enjoy a moshpit, and could be getting a little too old now (but never say never!).

Somehow I don’t think the author of Desiderata is speaking against that kind of experience. That was noisy alright, but it was fun, it was an experience, not a lifestyle. But what if we were caught up in the clamour of life, all or most of the time?

And that’s the phrase I think is important – ‘caught up’. Let’s find and hold on to our inner peace, our inner strength and carry that with us wherever we go. Rather than be caught up with everything around us, first of all be true to who we are, so that even if we (like me) soak up the energy and bustle and become energised by it, we’re not finding our core strength from that, we’re not lost in it all.

Its so easy to lose our sense of self and our sense of direction. Who are you when you are alone? I’m not talking about being a hermit – we are social beings after all. But each of us needs a core self, one that is not dependent on, or lost in, our environment. I think that many of us, through our insecurities, don’t know who we are, and as a result react to things around us, or get caught up in the moment. Hence the haste and lack of peace.

In holding on to our sense of self, we become less rattled and more able to thrive in any environment. We’re not overwhelmed by what is going on around us.

And that leads us to the second part of the quote – “remember what peace there may be in silence”. I know I struggle with silence. I feel like I need to do something (even watch a crappy movie! – see one of my earlier blogs). My wife doesn’t. Sometimes I see her just staring at the backyard from our living room (our backyard is nothing special, but when the lawn is mowed, on a sunny day it’s quite lovely). Or she sits outside in the sun doing nothing in particular.

I have to read, or watch, or do, or sleep. Perhaps I should change the words “have to” to “choose to”. I don’t “have to”, but I don’t know how to do nothing. I’m pretty sure I’m not alone in this (am I? What do you think?). I know I measure myself far too much by what I achieve or how well I do things – one could argue that I am caught up in “the noise and the haste”. It certainly feels like it often enough – no peace for my soul.

That doesn’t mean I’m never happy, or never relaxed. I’m probably happy often enough, but I’m definitely not often relaxed, and it would be nice to be more so.

So I look at the first line of “Desiderata” and say “Yes please”. The problem is knowing how to do it. Maybe the bit about becoming comfortable with silence is a good place to start (but how do you do that? – any suggestions?) So thank you Desiderata. I need to hear this.